Inner Ear Decompression Sickness in Sport Compressed‐Air Diving

@article{Nachum2001InnerED,
  title={Inner Ear Decompression Sickness in Sport Compressed‐Air Diving},
  author={Zohar Nachum and Avi Shupak and Orna Spitzer and Zohara Sharoni and Ilana Doweck and Carlos R. Gordon},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2001},
  volume={111}
}
Objective We report our experience over the past 12 years with recreational diving‐related inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS). 

Inner Ear Decompression Sickness and Inner Ear Barotrauma in Recreational Divers: A Long‐Term Follow‐Up

The authors' experience with the long‐term follow-up of patients with diving‐related inner ear decompression sickness and inner ear barotrauma was reported and residual cochlear and vestibular damage in relation to the question of fitness to dive was discussed.

Inner Ear Disorders in SCUBA Divers: A Review

An overview of the pathological conditions characterized by inner ear injury in SCUBA divers is provided, discussing their pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnostic work-up, and prevention.

SCUBA Medicine for Otolaryngologists: Part II. Diagnostic, Treatment, and Dive Fitness Recommendations

Challenge current practices and misconceptions in treating recreational SCUBA (Self‐contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers and standard of care for fitness to dive parameters based on the most up‐to‐date evidence.

Isolated inner ear decompression illness following a nitrogen/oxygen dive: the difficulty in differentiating inner ear decompression illness and inner ear barotrauma

This case illustrates the difficulty and importance in differentiating inner ear decompression illness and inner ear barotrauma and issues regarding the immediate treatment of cases such as these are addressed.

Inner ear decompression sickness in scuba divers: a review of 115 cases

  • E. GemppP. Louge
  • Medicine, Psychology
    European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
  • 2012
The high prevalence of RLS combined with a right-sided predominance of inner ear dysfunction suggests a preferential mechanism of paradoxical arterial gas emboli through a vascular anatomical selectivity.

Recurrent inner ear decompression sickness associated with a patent foramen ovale.

The relevant right-to-left shunt in the patient may have been the predisposing factor that caused the inner ear symptoms during his scuba dive, and the hypothesis of inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS) is suggested.

A Safe Treatment Concept for Divers With Acute Inner Ear Disorders

INTRODUCTION Sport diving is becoming more and more popular, with increasing numbers of people enjoying this sport. There are approximately six million sport divers in the United States with an

Diagnostic dilemmas in inner ear decompression sickness.

A series of cases, some of which were likely to be due to inner ear (vestibular) decompression sickness, and others which could be confused with this diagnosis are presented, to highlight the diagnostic and management dilemmas involved.

Susceptibility of the inner ear structure to shunt-related decompression sickness.

A retrospective study confirms the correlation between IEDCS and the presence of a significant patent foramen ovale (PFO) and responds slowly to treatment irrespective of the initial table used.

Vestibular effects of diving - a 6-year prospective study.

This study found no evidence of long-term vestibular effects in working divers, probably related to singular events, like inner ear barotraumas or inner ear DCI, rather than frequent diving per se.

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The analysis indicates that the presence of a PFO produces a 2.5 time increase in the odds ratio for developing serious (type II) DCS in all three types of divers, and does not warrant routine screening by echocardiography of sport, military, or commercial divers.

Risk of decompression sickness with patent foramen ovale.

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