Innate sensitivity for self-propelled causal agency in newly hatched chicks

@article{Mascalzoni2010InnateSF,
  title={Innate sensitivity for self-propelled causal agency in newly hatched chicks},
  author={Elena Mascalzoni and Lucia Regolin and Giorgio Vallortigara},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={107},
  pages={4483 - 4485}
}
The idea that sensitivity to self-produced motion could lie at the foundations of the clear-cut divide that the brain operates between the two basic domains of inanimate and animate objects dates back to Aristotle. Sensitivity to self-propelled objects is apparent in human infants from around the fifth month of age, which leaves undetermined whether it is acquired by experience with animate objects or whether it is innately predisposed in the brain. Here, we report that newly hatched, visually… 

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