Innate Recognition of Coral Snake Pattern by a Possible Avian Predator

@article{Smith1975InnateRO,
  title={Innate Recognition of Coral Snake Pattern by a Possible Avian Predator},
  author={S. M. Smith},
  journal={Science},
  year={1975},
  volume={187},
  pages={759 - 760}
}
  • S. M. Smith
  • Published 28 February 1975
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Inexperienced hand-reared motmots avoided a pattern of red and yellow rings but readily attacked a pattern of green and blue rings and also one of red and yellow stripes. The motmots' avoidance of the "coral snake%" pattern indicates that mimic snake species can derive protection from some potential predators. 

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Stiles for his help in finding and excavating the nests