Injuries among World-Class Professional Beach Volleyball Players

@article{Bahr2003InjuriesAW,
  title={Injuries among World-Class Professional Beach Volleyball Players},
  author={Roald Bahr and Jonathan C. Reeser},
  journal={The American Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2003},
  volume={31},
  pages={119 - 125}
}
  • R. Bahr, J. Reeser
  • Published 1 January 2003
  • Medicine, Education
  • The American Journal of Sports Medicine
Background Very little is known about the injury characteristics of beach volleyball. Purpose To describe the incidence and pattern of injuries among professional male and female beach volleyball players. Study Design Cohort study–retrospective injury recall and prospective registration. Methods Injuries occurring over a 7.5-week interval of the summer season were retrospectively registered by interviewing 178 of the 188 participating players (95%) in the 2001 Beach Volleyball World… 

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