Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

@article{Lander2001InitialSA,
  title={Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.},
  author={E. Lander and L. Linton and B. Birren and C. Nusbaum and M. Zody and J. Baldwin and K. Devon and K. Dewar and M. Doyle and W. Fitzhugh and R. Funke and D. Gage and K. Harris and A. Heaford and J. Howland and L. Kann and J. Lehoczky and R. Levine and P. McEwan and K. McKernan and J. Meldrim and J. Mesirov and C. Miranda and W. Morris and J. Naylor and C. Raymond and M. Rosetti and R. Santos and A. Sheridan and C. Sougnez and Y. Stange-Thomann and N. Stojanovic and A. Subramanian and D. Wyman and J. Rogers and J. Sulston and R. Ainscough and S. Beck and D. Bentley and J. Burton and C. Clee and N. Carter and A. Coulson and R. Deadman and P. Deloukas and A. Dunham and I. Dunham and R. Durbin and L. French and D. Grafham and S. Gregory and T. Hubbard and S. Humphray and A. Hunt and M. Jones and C. Lloyd and A. McMurray and L. Matthews and S. Mercer and S. Milne and J. Mullikin and A. Mungall and R. Plumb and M. Ross and R. Shownkeen and S. Sims and R. Waterston and R. Wilson and L. Hillier and J. McPherson and M. Marra and E. Mardis and L. Fulton and A. Chinwalla and K. Pepin and W. Gish and S. Chissoe and M. Wendl and K. Delehaunty and T. Miner and A. Delehaunty and J. Kramer and L. Cook and R. Fulton and D. L. Johnson and P. Minx and S. Clifton and T. Hawkins and E. Branscomb and P. Predki and P. Richardson and S. Wenning and T. Slezak and N. Doggett and J. Cheng and A. Olsen and S. Lucas and C. Elkin and E. Uberbacher and M. Frazier and R. Gibbs and D. Muzny and S. Scherer and J. Bouck and E. Sodergren and K. Worley and C. Rives and J. H. Gorrell and M. Metzker and S. Naylor and R. Kucherlapati and D. Nelson and G. Weinstock and Y. Sakaki and A. Fujiyama and M. Hattori and T. Yada and A. Toyoda and T. Itoh and C. Kawagoe and H. Watanabe and Y. Totoki and T. Taylor and J. Weissenbach and R. Heilig and W. Saurin and F. Artiguenave and P. Brottier and T. Bruls and E. Pelletier and C. Robert and P. Wincker and D. Smith and L. Doucette‐Stamm and M. Rubenfield and K. Weinstock and H. M. Lee and J. Dubois and A. Rosenthal and M. Platzer and G. Nyakatura and S. Taudien and A. Rump and H. Yang and J. Yu and J. Wang and G. Huang and J. Gu and L. Hood and L. Rowen and A. Madan and S. Qin and R. W. Davis and N. Federspiel and A. Abola and M. Proctor and R. M. Myers and J. Schmutz and M. Dickson and J. Grimwood and D. Cox and M. Olson and R. Kaul and N. Shimizu and K. Kawasaki and S. Minoshima and G. Evans and M. Athanasiou and R. Schultz and B. Roe and F. Chen and H. Pan and J. Ramser and H. Lehrach and R. Reinhardt and W. McCombie and M. de la Bastide and N. Dedhia and H. Bl{\"o}cker and K. Hornischer and G. Nordsiek and R. Agarwala and L. Aravind and J. Bailey and A. Bateman and S. Batzoglou and E. Birney and P. Bork and D. Brown and C. Burge and L. Cerutti and H. C. Chen and D. Church and M. Clamp and R. Copley and T. Doerks and S. Eddy and E. Eichler and T. Furey and J. Galagan and J. Gilbert and C. Harmon and Y. Hayashizaki and D. Haussler and H. Hermjakob and K. Hokamp and W. Jang and L. S. Johnson and T. A. Jones and S. Kasif and A. Kaspryzk and S. Kennedy and W. J. Kent and P. Kitts and E. Koonin and I. Korf and D. Kulp and D. Lancet and Gustavo Glusman and T. Lowe and A. McLysaght and T. Mikkelsen and J. V. Moran and N. Mulder and V. J. Pollara and C. Ponting and G. Schuler and J. Schultz and G. Slater and A. Smit and E. Stupka and J. Szustakowki and D. Thierry-Mieg and J. Thierry-Mieg and L. Wagner and J. Wallis and R. Wheeler and A. Williams and Y. I. Wolf and K. H. Wolfe and S. P. Yang and R. Yeh and F. Collins and M. Guyer and J. Peterson and A. Felsenfeld and K. Wetterstrand and A. Patrinos and M. Morgan and P. D. de Jong and J. Catanese and K. Osoegawa and H. Shizuya and S. Choi and Y. Chen},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={409 6822},
  pages={
          860-921
        }
}
The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence. 

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The molecular natural history of the human genome
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The end of all human DNA maps?
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Discovery of the human genome sequence in the public and private databases
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