Initial results from the InSight mission on Mars

@article{Banerdt2020InitialRF,
  title={Initial results from the InSight mission on Mars},
  author={William Bruce Banerdt and Suzanne E. Smrekar and Don Banfield and Domenico Giardini and Matthew P. Golombek and Catherine L. Johnson and Philippe Henri Lognonn{\'e} and Aymeric Spiga and Tilman Spohn and Cl{\'e}ment Perrin and Simon C. St{\"a}hler and Daniele Antonangeli and Sami W. Asmar and Caroline Beghein and N. E. Bowles and Ebru Bozdağ and Peter J. Chi and Ulrich R. Christensen and John F. Clinton and Gareth S. Collins and Ingrid J. Daubar and V{\'e}ronique Dehant and M{\'e}lanie Drilleau and Matthew O. Fillingim and William M. Folkner and Rapha{\"e}l F. Garcia and James B Garvin and John Grant and Matthias Grott and Jerzy Grygorczuk and Troy L. Hudson and Jessica C. E. Irving and G. Kargl and Taichi Kawamura and Sharon Kedar and Scott King and Brigitte Knapmeyer‐Endrun and Martin Knapmeyer and Mark T. Lemmon and Ralph D. Lorenz and Justin N. Maki and Ludovic Margerin and Scott M. McLennan and Chlo{\'e} Michaut and David Mimoun and Anna Magdalena Mittelholz and Antoine Mocquet and P. Morgan and Nils T. Mueller and Naomi Murdoch and Seiichi Nagihara and Claire E. Newman and Francis Nimmo and Mark Paul Panning and William Thomas Pike and Ana‐Catalina Plesa and S{\'e}bastien Rodriguez and Jose Antonio Rodriguez-Manfredi and Christopher T. Russell and Nicholas Charles Schmerr and Matthew A. Siegler and Sabine Stanley and E. Stutzmann and Nicholas A. Teanby and Jeroen Tromp and Martin van Driel and Nicholas Hale Warner and Renee C. Weber and Mark A. Wieczorek},
  journal={Nature Geoscience},
  year={2020},
  volume={13},
  pages={183-189}
}
NASA’s InSight (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission landed in Elysium Planitia on Mars on 26 November 2018. It aims to determine the interior structure, composition and thermal state of Mars, as well as constrain present-day seismicity and impact cratering rates. Such information is key to understanding the differentiation and subsequent thermal evolution of Mars, and thus the forces that shape the planet’s surface geology and volatile… Expand

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The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission landed in Elysium Planitia on Mars on 26 November 2018 and fully deployed its seismometer by theExpand
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The Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport (InSight) Mission will focus on Mars’ interior structure and evolution. The basic structure of crust, mantle, andExpand
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