Initial Upper Palaeolithic Homo sapiens from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria

@article{Hublin2020InitialUP,
  title={Initial Upper Palaeolithic Homo sapiens from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria},
  author={Jean-Jacques Hublin and Nikolay V. Sirakov and Vera Aldeias and Shara E. Bailey and Edouard Bard and Vincent Delvigne and Elena Endarova and Y Fagault and Helen Fewlass and Mateja Hajdinjak and Bernd Kromer and I. Krumov and Jo{\~a}o Marreiros and Naomi L. Martisius and Lindsey Paskulin and Virginie Sinet-Mathiot and Matthias Meyer and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo and Vasil V. Popov and Željko Re{\vz}ek and Svoboda Sirakova and Matthew M. Skinner and Geoff M. Smith and Rosen Spasov and Sahra Talamo and Thibaut Tuna and Lukas Wacker and Frido Welker and Arndt Wilcke and Nikolay Zahariev and Shannon P. McPherron and Tsenka Tsanova},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={581},
  pages={299 - 302}
}
The Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition in Europe witnessed the replacement and partial absorption of local Neanderthal populations by Homo sapiens populations of African origin1. However, this process probably varied across regions and its details remain largely unknown. In particular, the duration of chronological overlap between the two groups is much debated, as are the implications of this overlap for the nature of the biological and cultural interactions between Neanderthals and H… 
A 14C chronology for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria
TLDR
A new radiocarbon chronology for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at the Bulgarian site of Bacho Kiro reveals Homo sapiens-associated sediments as early as 46,940 yr bp, which provides chronological context for the early occupation of Europe by UpperPalaeolithic H. sapiens.
Initial Upper Palaeolithic humans in Europe had recent Neanderthal ancestry
TLDR
Genome-wide data from three individuals dated to between 45,930 and 42,580 years ago from Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria are presented, confirming that the first European modern humans mixed with Neanderthals and suggesting that such mixing could have been common.
A late Neanderthal tooth from northeastern Italy.
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Novel and direct evidence of the late Neanderthal occupation in northern Italy that preceded the marked cultural and technological shift documented by the Uluzzian layers in the archaeological sequence at Riparo Broion is described.
The morphology of the Late Pleistocene hominin remains from the site of La Cotte de St Brelade, Jersey (Channel Islands).
TLDR
An updated description of the morphology of this material is provided and its likely taxonomic assignment from comparison with Neanderthal and Homo sapiens samples is considered, and one of the original teeth has been lost, and it is identified as nonhominin.
Gravettian cranial morphology and human group affinities during the European Upper Palaeolithic
TLDR
This study analyzes a large database of well-dated and well-preserved UP crania, including MUP specimens from South-West France (SWF) and Moravia, using 3D geometric morphometrics to test for human group affinities, and shows that the Gravettian makers from these two regions form a remarkably phenetically homogeneous sample.
Subsistence behavior during the Initial Upper Paleolithic in Europe: Site use, dietary practice, and carnivore exploitation at Bacho Kiro Cave (Bulgaria).
TLDR
A shift in site use and occupation intensity through time is identified, marked by increased find density and human modifications in Layer I, which indicates a more frequent or prolonged occupation of the site by IUP groups.
Palaeoenvironmental and seasonal context of the Late Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic occupations in Crimea: an approach using dental wear patterns in ungulates
The Crimean Peninsula has a rich archaeological record characterised by numerous multi-layered sites from the Middle Palaeolithic and by a number of important sites representing the transition from
How old are the oldest Homo sapiens in Far East Asia?
  • J. Hublin
  • Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2021
TLDR
Questions are raised about the dating of some of the foremost Chinese hominin sites that have been central to discussions about the timing of the arrival of Homo sapiens in Far East Asia and about the way the archeological and fossil records in this region can be interpreted.
The early Aurignacian dispersal of modern humans into westernmost Eurasia
TLDR
The archaeological and radiocarbon data provide definitive evidence that modern humans were in western Iberia at a time when, if present at all, Neanderthal populations would have been extremely sparse, and support a very rapid, unimpeded dispersal of modern humans across western Eurasia.
The Initial Upper Paleolithic in Central and East Asia: Blade Technology, Cultural Transmission, and Implications for Human Dispersals
Archaeological assemblages labeled as Initial Upper Paleolithic are often seen as possible evidence for dispersals of Homo sapiens populations in Eurasia, ca. 45,000 years ago. While most authors
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A 14C chronology for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at Bacho Kiro Cave, Bulgaria
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A new radiocarbon chronology for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition at the Bulgarian site of Bacho Kiro reveals Homo sapiens-associated sediments as early as 46,940 yr bp, which provides chronological context for the early occupation of Europe by UpperPalaeolithic H. sapiens.
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