Inhibition of proteasomal activity causes inclusion formation in neuronal and non-neuronal cells overexpressing Parkin.

@article{Ardley2003InhibitionOP,
  title={Inhibition of proteasomal activity causes inclusion formation in neuronal and non-neuronal cells overexpressing Parkin.},
  author={Helen C. Ardley and Gina B. Scott and Stephen A. Rose and Nancy G S Tan and Alexander F. Markham and Philip J. Robinson},
  journal={Molecular biology of the cell},
  year={2003},
  volume={14 11},
  pages={
          4541-56
        }
}
Association between protein inclusions and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and polyglutamine disorders, has been widely documented. Although ubiquitin is conjugated to many of these aggregated proteins, the 26S proteasome does not efficiently degrade them. Mutations in the ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin are associated with autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism. Although Parkin-positive inclusions are not detected in brains of autosomal recessive… CONTINUE READING

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