Infrared imaging in vipers: differential responses of crotaline and viperine snakes to paired thermal targets

@article{Safer2004InfraredII,
  title={Infrared imaging in vipers: differential responses of crotaline and viperine snakes to paired thermal targets},
  author={Adam B. Safer and Michael S. Grace},
  journal={Behavioural Brain Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={154},
  pages={55-61}
}
Defensive and infrared reception responses of true vipers, pitvipers, Azemiops and colubrids
TLDR
The results suggest that the tested species of true vipers, Azemiops and colubrids may not posses the ability to sense infrared radiation or do not use it in a defensive context, and suggest that some defensive behaviors are associated with the pit organ in pitvipers.
Cooler snakes respond more strongly to infrared stimuli, but we have no idea why
TLDR
Physiological and biochemical process rates and, usually, behavioral responsiveness increase with temperature, but rattlesnakes sensing warm moving targets with their facial pits are less responsive as body temperature increases.
Palestine Saw-scaled Vipers hunt disadvantaged avian migrants
Reduced Performance of Prey Targeting in Pit Vipers with Contralaterally Occluded Infrared and Visual Senses
TLDR
Results indicate that, visual and infrared information are both effective in prey targeting in this species, although interference between the two modalities occurs if visual and IR information is restricted to opposite sides of the brain.
The effects of temperature on the defensive strikes of rattlesnakes
TLDR
The results suggest that, although rattlesnakes are at a greater risk of predation at colder body temperatures, their decrease in strike performance may be mitigated to some extent by employing mechanisms in addition to skeletal muscle contraction to power strikes.
Infrared Snake Eyes: TRPA1 and the Thermal Sensitivity of the Snake Pit Organ
TLDR
New evidence shows that pit organs respond to temperature using the warmth-activated cation channel TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1), a finding that provides a first glimpse of the underlying molecular hardware.
Molecular Basis of Infrared Detection by Snakes
TLDR
TRPA1 orthologues from pit-bearing snakes are the most heat-sensitive vertebrate ion channels thus far identified, consistent with their role as primary transducers of infrared stimuli, and illustrate the broad evolutionary tuning of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as thermosensors in the vertebrate nervous system.
Ganglion-specific splicing of TRPV1 underlies infrared sensation in vampire bats
TLDR
It is shown that vampire bats tune a channel that is already heat-sensitive, TRPV1, by lowering its thermal activation threshold to about 30 °C, revealing a novel molecular mechanism for physiological tuning of thermosensory nerve fibres.
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References

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Strike-Induced Chemosensory Searching by Rattlesnakes: The Role of Envenomation-Related Chemical Cues in the Post-Strike Environment
TLDR
Rattlesnakes and many other viperids typically strike and release adult rodent prey, allowing the envenomated rodent to wander up to 600 cm before succumbing to the venom (Estep et al., 1981).
Thermal Sensitivity as a Specialization for Prey Capture and Feeding in Snakes
TLDR
It is suggested that in the sensory hierarchy, heat information functionally replaces the mechanical information which is utilized by snakes without pit organs, and Poststrike behavior on the other hand is mainly guided by chemical cues in all snakes.
Rattlesnake Hunting Behavior: Correlations between Plasticity of Predatory Performance and Neuroanatomy
TLDR
Rattlesnakes may shift between visual and infrared stimuli without significant loss of predatory performance during an envenomating strike, but do not maintain a high level of equivalent predatory performance when switching between chemosensory stimuli i.e., olfactory, and vomeronasal information.
Thermoregulation is the pits: use of thermal radiation for retreat site selection by rattlesnakes
TLDR
It is found that western diamondback rattlesnakes could base thermoregulatory decisions on thermal radiation cues when their pits were functional, but not when blocked, and this indicates that the facial pit is part of a generalized sense, and suggests thermoreGulation as an alternative hypothesis to prey acquisition for the origin of facial pits.
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TLDR
The present paper is a preliminary report based on multi-unit analysis to find out what can be learned of the function of this organ by recording activity from its nerves.
Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 3
TLDR
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Central response to infra-red stimulation of the pit receptors in a crotaline snake, Trimeresurus flavoviridis.
TLDR
Both action potentials and evoked potentials were recorded from the tectum opticum of a crotaline snake, Trimeresurus flavoviridis, in response to infra-red stimulation of the facial pit organs, raising the possibility of stereoscopic perception.
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