Informing parents about CT radiation exposure in children: it's OK to tell them.

@article{Larson2007InformingPA,
  title={Informing parents about CT radiation exposure in children: it's OK to tell them.},
  author={David B. Larson and Scott B Rader and Howard P. Forman and L.Z. Fenton},
  journal={AJR. American journal of roentgenology},
  year={2007},
  volume={189 2},
  pages={
          271-5
        }
}
OBJECTIVE The purpose of our study was to determine how parents' understanding of and willingness to allow their children to undergo CT change after receiving information regarding radiation dose and risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS One hundred parents of children undergoing nonemergent CT studies at a tertiary-care children's hospital were surveyed before and after reading an informational handout describing radiation risk. Parental knowledge of whether CT uses radiation or increases lifetime… 

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