Information provision for allergic consumers – where are we going with food allergen labelling?

@article{Mills2004InformationPF,
  title={Information provision for allergic consumers – where are we going with food allergen labelling?},
  author={En Clare Mills and Errka Valovirta and Charlotte Bernhard Madsen and S.L. Taylor and Stefan Vieths and Elke Anklam and Sabine Baumgartner and P. Koch and Rene W.R. Crevel and Lynn J. Frewer},
  journal={Allergy},
  year={2004},
  volume={59}
}
As the current treatment for food allergy involves dietary exclusion of the problem food, information for food‐allergic consumers provided on food labels about the nature of allergenic ingredients is important to the management of their condition. The members of an EU‐funded networking project, InformAll, focusing on developing strategies for the provision of credible, reliable sources of information for food allergy sufferers, regulators and the food industry, have been considering these… 
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