Information and decision-making needs among people with affective disorders – results of an online survey

@article{Liebherz2015InformationAD,
  title={Information and decision-making needs among people with affective disorders – results of an online survey},
  author={Sarah Liebherz and Lisa Tlach and Martin H{\"a}rter and J{\"o}rg Dirmaier},
  journal={Patient preference and adherence},
  year={2015},
  volume={9},
  pages={627 - 638}
}
Background Patient decision aids are one possibility for enabling and encouraging patients to participate in medical decisions. Objective This paper aims to describe patients’ information and decision-making needs as a prerequisite for the development of high-quality, web-based patient decision aids for affective disorders. Design We conducted an online cross-sectional survey by using a self-administered questionnaire including items on Internet use, online health information needs, role in… Expand
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