Informal Borrowers and Financial Exclusion: The Invisible Unbanked at the Intersections of Race and Gender

@article{Long2020InformalBA,
  title={Informal Borrowers and Financial Exclusion: The Invisible Unbanked at the Intersections of Race and Gender},
  author={Melanie G. Long},
  journal={Review of Black Political Economy},
  year={2020},
  volume={47},
  pages={363 - 403}
}
Previous work has found that predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods continue to have less access to mainstream financial services and a greater prevalence of high-cost alternatives. Less attention has been dedicated to the other financial tools available to financially excluded households. Borrowing from friends and family is one widely used yet under-examined strategy for coping with emergency expenses. The literature provides preliminary evidence that informal borrowing and the costs… Expand

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