Influenza: old and new threats

@article{Palese2004InfluenzaOA,
  title={Influenza: old and new threats},
  author={Peter Palese},
  journal={Nature Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={10 Suppl 1},
  pages={S82-S87}
}
  • P. Palese
  • Published 1 December 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature Medicine
Influenza remains an important disease in humans and animals. In contrast to measles, smallpox and poliomyelitis, influenza is caused by viruses that undergo continuous antigenic change and that possess an animal reservoir. Thus, new epidemics and pandemics are likely to occur in the future, and eradication of the disease will be difficult to achieve. Although it is not clear whether a new pandemic is imminent, it would be prudent to take into account the lessons we have learned from studying… Expand
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