Influence of number of pollinations and pollen load size on maternal fitness costs in Collinsia heterophylla: implications for existence of a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity

@article{Madjidian2012InfluenceON,
  title={Influence of number of pollinations and pollen load size on maternal fitness costs in Collinsia heterophylla: implications for existence of a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity},
  author={J. Madjidian and S. Hydbom and {\AA}. Lankinen},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={25}
}
Costs related to pollen competition have rarely been considered, but are expected in the case of sexual conflict where male and female sexual functions have opposing evolutionary interests. In Collinsia heterophylla, delayed stigma receptivity is beneficial as it enhances pollen competition. A sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity has been proposed in this species as early pollination, following one‐time pollinations, is advantageous to pollen donors at a cost of reduced maternal… Expand
Selection on pollen and pistil traits during pollen competition is affected by both sexual conflict and mixed mating in a self-compatible herb.
TLDR
Early-fertilizing pollen rather than rapidly growing pollen tubes was most successful in terms of siring success, especially in competition with self-pollen after pollination at early floral stages, in agreement with selection against antagonistic pollen. Expand
Sexual antagonism in the pistil varies among populations of a hermaphroditic mixed‐mating plant
TLDR
Results indicate that sexually antagonistic selection may be present in varying degrees in different populations of C. heterophylla, but this variation does not appear to be directly related to mating system variation. Expand
Can Sexual Selection Cause Divergence in Mating System–Related Floral Traits?
TLDR
The results from the C. heterophylla experimental evolution lines suggest that a component of sexual selection during outcross pollination could enhance the patterns of floral divergence commonly found between outcrossers and selfers. Expand
Direct and indirect selection on mate choice during pollen competition: Effects of male and female sexual traits on offspring performance following two‐donor crosses
TLDR
Delayed stigma receptivity may be selected through both direct and indirect fitness effects in C. heterophylla, where pollen‐based delay on stigma receptality might act as a cue for mate choice, however, selection may also be counteracted by antagonistic selection on pollen to advance stigma receptivities. Expand
Sexually antagonistic evolution caused by male–male competition in the pistil
TLDR
It was found that high siring success of early arriving pollen competing with later‐arriving pollen was associated with high female fitness costs, consistent with an interlocus sexual conflict. Expand
Effects of soil resources on expression of a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity in a mixed-mating plant
TLDR
Even though soil resource environment had a low impact on the sexual conflict traits and related costs in C. heterophylla, it generated variability in pollen donor-influence on this trait and in recipient sorting among donors, suggesting that both sexual conflict and sexual selection is affected by environmental factors not only in animals but also in plants. Expand
Differential selection on pollen and pistil traits in relation to pollen competition in the context of a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity
TLDR
It is shown that pollen and pistil traits involved in a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity are differentially advantageous during pollen competition depending on stage of floral development and varying pollen deposition schedules. Expand
Sexual conflict in protandrous flowers and the evolution of gynodioecy *
TLDR
It is demonstrated that sexual conflict has played a role in the spread of females in gynodioecious populations of Cyananthus delavayi in the pollen‐limited environments in which this subalpine species occurs and a trade‐off between male and female‐phase duration with no influence on overall floral longevity is demonstrated. Expand
Male interference with pollination efficiency in a hermaphroditic orchid
TLDR
Empirical evidence is provided that male interference with pollination efficiency can occur in a hermaphroditic plant and that such interference can compromise fecundity. Expand
Geographic variation in floral traits is associated with environmental and genetic differences among populations of the mixed mating species Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae)
TLDR
This work used mixed-mating Collinsia heterophylla Buist to explore variation in a suite of floral traits related to mating system in populations representing four geographic regions of California, USA, and relate this variation to geography, climatic factors, and local site characteristics. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 94 REFERENCES
Pollen Donor Identity Affects Timing of Stigma Receptivity in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae): A Sexual Conflict during Pollen Competition?
TLDR
The results suggest that female control on timing of stigma receptivity is not complete in this species, and fertilizations that occurred early during floral development resulted in fewer seeds than later fertilizations, possibly indicating a cost of lost control over the onset of receptivity. Expand
Sexual conflict and selection on pistil and pollen traits
TLDR
The main theme of this thesis concerns the delayed stigma receptivity previously documented in flowers of this species, a female trait assumed to enhance pollen competition, allowing a “fair start” of all pollen in the race towards the ovules, consequently allowing for sorting in favour of pollen grains or donors of superior quality. Expand
Enhancing pollen competition by delaying stigma receptivity: pollen deposition schedules affect siring ability, paternal diversity, and seed production in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae).
TLDR
Fitness advantages of enhancing pollen competition by delaying stigma receptivity in C. heterophylla are suggested, particularly in relation to increased paternal diversity, which was associated with increased seed production. Expand
Delayed stigma receptivity in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae): genetic variation and adaptive significance in relation to pollen competition, delayed self-pollination, and mating-system evolution.
TLDR
Phenotypic and genetic variation within populations in the timing of stigma receptivity and anther-stigma contact was substantial, although slightly less for the contact, and an among-genet phenotypic correlation between the traits was not found, indicating that each trait may respond independently to selection, and the trait association may be the result of correlational selection. Expand
Estimation of heritability, evolvability and genetic correlations of two pollen and pistil traits involved in a sexual conflict over timing of stigma receptivity in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae).
TLDR
It is concluded that the ability to delay fertilization in presence of pollen can respond to selection, while the pollen trait has lower evolutionary potential. Expand
SEXUAL CONFLICT OVER FLORAL RECEPTIVITY
TLDR
The hypothesis that postpollination wilting may be influenced by pollen and serve as a general means to secure paternity of the pollen donor at the expense of female fitness is explored. Expand
Pollen-tube growth rates in Collinsia heterophylla (Plantaginaceae): one-donor crosses reveal heritability but no effect on sporophytic-offspring fitness.
TLDR
The results suggest that pollen-tube growth rate can respond to selection via male function, consistent with the hypothesis that pollen competition is itself selectively advantageous, through both male and female function, by reducing the genetic load among successful gametophytic fathers (pollen), and reducing inbreeding depression associated with self-pollination in plants with mix-mating systems. Expand
Seed paternity in flowering plants: an evolutionary perspective
TLDR
There is still need for greater data wealth on seed paternity to test theories of sex allocation and to gain deeper understanding of floral trait evolution and of the evolutionary consequences of post-pollination selection in flowering plants. Expand
Analysis of pollen-style interactions in Petunia hybrida; the determination of variance in male reproductive success
  • M. Cruzan
  • Biology
  • Sexual Plant Reproduction
  • 2004
TLDR
There was less pollen tube attrition after bud pollinations than after flower pollinations, indicating that styles of buds were less able to inhibit pollen tubes, and the level of variation in pollen growth after pollination to flowers was greater among clones than among ramets within clones. Expand
Potential selection for female choice in Viola tricolor
TLDR
In hermaphroditic violets, Viola tricolor, it is found that pollen tube growth rate in vitro is an indicator of donor sporophytic quality expressed as seed production, and there is a potential for selection on traits that increase the probability that ovules are fertilized by fast-growing pollen. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...