Influence of jellyfish blooms on carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling and plankton production

@article{Pitt2008InfluenceOJ,
  title={Influence of jellyfish blooms on carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling and plankton production},
  author={Kylie A. Pitt and David T. Welsh and Robert H. Condon},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2008},
  volume={616},
  pages={133-149}
}
Due to their boom and bust population dynamics and the enormous biomasses they can attain, jellyfish and ctenophores can have a large influence on the cycling of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). This review initially summarises the biochemical composition of jellyfish, and compares and contrasts the mechanisms by which non-zooxanthellate and zooxanthellate jellyfish acquire and recycle C, N and P. The potential influence of elemental cycling by populations of jellyfish on… 
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