Influence of hyperoxia on muscle metabolic responses and the power–duration relationship during severe‐intensity exercise in humans: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

@article{Vanhatalo2010InfluenceOH,
  title={Influence of hyperoxia on muscle metabolic responses and the power–duration relationship during severe‐intensity exercise in humans: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study},
  author={Anni Vanhatalo and Jonathan Fulford and Fred J. DiMenna and Andrew M. Jones},
  journal={Experimental Physiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={95}
}
Severe‐intensity constant‐work‐rate exercise results in the attainment of maximal oxygen uptake, but the muscle metabolic milieu at the limit of tolerance (Tlim) for such exercise remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that Tlim during severe‐intensity exercise would be associated with the attainment of consistently low values of intramuscular phosphocreatine ([PCr]) and pH, as determined using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, irrespective of the work rate and the inspired O2 fraction… 

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