Influence of handling stress and fasting on estimates of ammonium excretion by tadpoles and fish: recommendations for designing excretion experiments

@article{Whiles2009InfluenceOH,
  title={Influence of handling stress and fasting on estimates of ammonium excretion by tadpoles and fish: recommendations for designing excretion experiments},
  author={M. Whiles and A. Huryn and B. W. Taylor and J. Reeve},
  journal={Limnology and Oceanography-methods},
  year={2009},
  volume={7},
  pages={1-7}
}
Excretion rate estimates are important for linking consumers to biogeochemical processes. Short-term incubations in chambers are a common approach for studies. This, however, may result in inaccuracies due to a welldocumented decline in excretion with time, which is often attributed to fasting. An alternative explanation, however, is that excretion slows during recovery from handling stress. Whereas shorter incubations may reduce fasting effects, longer incubations can allow for recovery from… Expand

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