Inflammatory potential of the diet and colorectal tumor risk in persons with Lynch syndrome.

@article{Brouwer2017InflammatoryPO,
  title={Inflammatory potential of the diet and colorectal tumor risk in persons with Lynch syndrome.},
  author={Jesca G.M. Brouwer and Maureen Makama and Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh and Hans F. A. Vasen and Fokko M. Nagengast and Jan H. Kleibeuker and Ellen Kampman and Fr{\"a}nzel J. B. van Duijnhoven},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={2017},
  volume={106 5},
  pages={
          1287-1294
        }
}
Background: Persons with Lynch syndrome (LS) have high lifetime risk of developing colorectal tumors (CRTs) because of a germline mutation in one of their mismatch repair (MMR) genes. An important process in the development of CRTs is inflammation, which has been shown to be modulated by diet.Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between the inflammatory potential of the diet and the risk of CRTs in persons with LS.Design: We used the dietary intake of 457 persons with LS from a… 

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