Inferring the popularity of an opinion from its familiarity: a repetitive voice can sound like a chorus.

@article{Weaver2007InferringTP,
  title={Inferring the popularity of an opinion from its familiarity: a repetitive voice can sound like a chorus.},
  author={Kimberlee Weaver and Stephen M. Garcia and Norbert Schwarz and Dale T. Miller},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2007},
  volume={92 5},
  pages={
          821-33
        }
}
Despite the importance of doing so, people do not always correctly estimate the distribution of opinions within their group. One important mechanism underlying such misjudgments is people's tendency to infer that a familiar opinion is a prevalent one, even when its familiarity derives solely from the repeated expression of 1 group member. Six experiments demonstrate this effect and show that it holds even when perceivers are consciously aware that the opinions come from 1 speaker. The results… 

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