Inferring kinship from behaviour: Maternity determinations in yellow baboons

@article{Walters1981InferringKF,
  title={Inferring kinship from behaviour: Maternity determinations in yellow baboons},
  author={Jeffrey R. Walters},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1981},
  volume={29},
  pages={126-136}
}
Kinship is commonly inferred from behaviour in primate field studies, but the validity of such inferences has not yet been documented. A comparison of the relationships of six three-year-old yellow baboon (Papio cynocephalus) females with 14 adult females showed that when a juvenile's mother was living she could easily be identified from behavioural data. The most useful behaviour in this context was Presenting For Grooming. When the mother was not living, however, the juvenile compen- sated by… Expand

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