Inferring Nonneutral Evolution from Human-Chimp-Mouse Orthologous Gene Trios

@article{Clark2003InferringNE,
  title={Inferring Nonneutral Evolution from Human-Chimp-Mouse Orthologous Gene Trios},
  author={Andrew G. Clark and Stephen A. Glanowski and Rasmus Nielsen and Paul D. Thomas and Anish Kejariwal and Melissa A. Todd and David M. Tanenbaum and Daniel Civello and Fu Lu and Brian Murphy and Steve Ferriera and Gary Wang and Xianqgun Zheng and Thomas J. White and John Sninsky and Mark D. Adams and Michele Cargill},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={302},
  pages={1960 - 1963}
}
Even though human and chimpanzee gene sequences are nearly 99% identical, sequence comparisons can nevertheless be highly informative in identifying biologically important changes that have occurred since our ancestral lineages diverged. We analyzed alignments of 7645 chimpanzee gene sequences to their human and mouse orthologs. These three-species sequence alignments allowed us to identify genes undergoing natural selection along the human and chimp lineage by fitting models that include… 
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