Inferior vestibular neuritis.

@article{Halmagyi2002InferiorVN,
  title={Inferior vestibular neuritis.},
  author={G. Michael Halmagyi and Swee T. Aw and Mikael Karlberg and Ian S. Curthoys and Michael J. Todd},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={956},
  pages={306-13}
}
Sudden, spontaneous, unilateral loss of vestibular function without simultaneous hearing loss or brain stem signs is generally attributed to a viral infection involving the vestibular nerve and is called acute vestibular neuritis. The clinical hallmarks of acute vestibular neuritis are vertigo, spontaneous nystagmus, and unilateral loss of lateral semicircular function as shown by impulsive and caloric testing. In some patients with vestibular neuritis the process appears to involve only… CONTINUE READING