Inferior olive hypertrophy and cerebellar learning are both needed to explain ocular oscillations in oculopalatal tremor.

@article{Hong2008InferiorOH,
  title={Inferior olive hypertrophy and cerebellar learning are both needed to explain ocular oscillations in oculopalatal tremor.},
  author={Simon Hong and Richard Leigh and D. S. Zee and Lance M. Optican},
  journal={Progress in brain research},
  year={2008},
  volume={171},
  pages={
          219-26
        }
}
A new model of cerebellar learning explains how the cerebellum can generate arbitrary output waveforms to adjust output timing in the classical delay conditioning. This model can also reproduce the low frequency ocular oscillations seen in oculopalatal tremor (OPT). A novel circuit in the cerebellum uses both interneurons (INs) and Purkinje cells (PC) to control timing. Brain lesions that cause OPT give rise to hypertrophy of the inferior olive (IO) and an increase in conductance through gap… CONTINUE READING

Citations

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[Treatment options for nystagmus].

  • Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde
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rbitView : Eye movement visualization software

imon Honga, Lance M. Opticana, Edmond J. FitzGibbona, David S. Zeeb, Aasef G. Shaikhc
  • 2011

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