Infection by Haemoproteus Parasites in Four Species of Frigatebirds and the Description of a New Species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae)

@inproceedings{Merino2012InfectionBH,
  title={Infection by Haemoproteus Parasites in Four Species of Frigatebirds and the Description of a New Species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae)},
  author={Santiago Merino and Janos C. Hennicke and Javier Mart{\'i}nez and Katrin Ludynia and Roxana Torres and Thierry M Work and Stedson Stroud and Juan F. Masello and Petra Quillfeldt},
  booktitle={The Journal of parasitology},
  year={2012}
}
Abstract: Among seabirds, the fregatids stand out with a high prevalence of blood parasites. Four of 5 species in this family have been found to be infected with Haemoproteus; however, complete species descriptions with molecular phylogeny are lacking. Seventy-five samples from 4 species of frigatebirds, i.e., Fregata andrewsi, Fregata minor, Fregata magnificens, and Fregata aquila, were screened for infections caused by species of Haemoproteus. Four different parasite haplotypes were found… 
Haemoproteus iwa in Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor) in the Islands of the Western Indian Ocean
TLDR
Support is provided for transmission of blood parasites in seabirds in the Western Indian Ocean and it is suggested that migrations between the Pacific and the Indian oceans could favor the large-scale distribution of Haemoproteus iwa in frigatebird populations.
Molecular characterization of five widespread avian haemosporidian parasites (Haemosporida), with perspectives on the PCR-based detection of haemosporidians in wildlife
TLDR
This study indicates that morphological characters, which have been traditionally used in taxonomy of avian haemosporidian parasites, have a phylogenetic value.
Two new species of Haemoproteus Kruse, 1890 (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) from European birds, with emphasis on DNA barcoding for detection of haemosporidians in wildlife
TLDR
The importance of combining molecular techniques and light microscopy in the identification and field studies of avian haemosporidian parasites is emphasised, particularly in veterinary studies addressing insufficiently investigated tissue pathology caused by these parasites.
Molecular characterisation of three avian haemoproteids (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae), with the description of Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) palloris n. sp.
TLDR
Findings show that morphological characters, which have been traditionally used in the description of haemosporidians, exhibit phylogenetic congruence, and provides new molecular markers (cyt b and apicoplast gene sequences) for the diagnostics of inadequately investigated haemsporidian infections.
Molecular characterization of haemosporidian parasites (Haemosporida) in yellow wagtail (Motacillaflava), with description of in vitro ookinetes of Haemoproteus motacillae.
TLDR
This study contributes to the molecular identification of avian haemosporidian parasites and provides information on morphology of H. motacillae ookinetes, which is additional information assisting the microscopic identification of this species.
Blood parasites in noddies and boobies from Brazilian offshore islands – differences between species and influence of nesting habitat
TLDR
Five species of two genera of seabirds that breed on Atlantic Ocean islands off Brazil were used to detect parasites of the genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon and Babesia, and intensity of infection was so low that parasites remained undetected in blood smears.
Haemosporidian Parasites of Chilean Ducks: the Importance of Biogeography and Nonpasserine Hosts
TLDR
The results add to the growing body of evidence that nonpasserine hosts support unique lineages of haemosporidian parasites, while also demonstrating the role of biogeography in haemOSporidian parasite diversity in the temperate Neotropics.
Prevalence and genetic diversity of avian haemosporidian parasites in wild bird species of the order Columbiformes
TLDR
The results support previous suggestions that migratory birds have a higher prevalence and diversity of blood parasites than resident or short-distance migratory species.
Haemoproteus syrnii (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae) in owls from Brazil: morphological and molecular characterization, potential cryptic species, and exo-erythrocytic stages
TLDR
It is revealed, for the first time, that lungs and skeletal muscle are exo-erythrocytic stage location of H. syrnii, and that the parasite is linked to the histopathological changes found in owls, and improves host-parasite relationship understanding under an owl conservation perspective.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES
Hemosporidian blood parasites in seabirds—a comparative genetic study of species from Antarctic to tropical habitats
TLDR
This work amplified a DNA fragment from the cytochrome b gene to detect parasites of the genera Plasmodium, Leucocytozoon, and Haemoproteus in 14 seabird species, ranging from Antarctica to the tropical Indian Ocean, and found a high parasite prevalence in a single tropical species, the Christmas Island frigatebird Fregata andrewsi.
Haemoproteus iwa n. sp. in great frigatebirds (Fregata minor [Gmelin]) from Hawaii: parasite morphology and prevalence.
TLDR
A new species of Haemoproteus Kruse, 1890 from great frigatebirds captured on Tern Island-French Frigate Shoals and Laysan Island in Hawaii is described, the first documentation of a hemoparasite from tropical pelagic seabirds in Hawaii and the first description of an endemic hemoparsite in the archipelago.
A restriction site to differentiate Plasmodium and Haemoproteus infections in birds: on the inefficiency of general primers for detection of mixed infections
TLDR
In conclusion, parasite DNA amplification using general primers to determine the species composition of haemosporidian infections in individual hosts is not recommended and specific primers for each species and study area should be designed until a new method can efficiently discriminate both parasites.
Prevalence and differential host‐specificity of two avian blood parasite genera in the Australo‐Papuan region
TLDR
The host distribution and host‐specificity of these parasites in birds from two relatively understudied and isolated locations are examined and suggest that lineages of Plasmodium are more likely to form evolutionarily–stable associations with novel hosts.
Avian haemoproteidae. I. Description of Haemoproteus fallisi n. sp. and a review of the haemoproteids of the family Turdidae.
TLDR
H. fallisi is compared with other haemoproteids described from the Turdidae and is distinguished from H. danilewskyi by its larger size and by the fact that it surrounds the host cell nucleus and occupies nearly all of thehost cell cytoplasm.
PREVALENCE AND DIVERSITY OF AVIAN HEMATOZOAN PARASITES IN ASIA: A REGIONAL SURVEY
TLDR
Comparison between low-elevation habitat in India and Myanmar showed a difference in prevalence of haematozoans, which may indicate cross-transmission of parasite lineages may be less likely in South Korea and India.
Blood Parasites of Passerine Birds from Central Spain
TLDR
Sixteen species of passerine birds captured during a 2.5 yr period in Central Spain were examined for hematozoa and more than one-half of the birds examined were infected with at least one parasite species.
...
...