Infants prefer the musical meter of their own culture: a cross-cultural comparison.

@article{Soley2010InfantsPT,
  title={Infants prefer the musical meter of their own culture: a cross-cultural comparison.},
  author={Gaye Soley and Erin E. Hannon},
  journal={Developmental psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={46 1},
  pages={
          286-92
        }
}
Infants prefer native structures such as familiar faces and languages. Music is a universal human activity containing structures that vary cross-culturally. For example, Western music has temporally regular metric structures, whereas music of the Balkans (e.g., Bulgaria, Macedonia, Turkey) can have both regular and irregular structures. We presented 4- to 8-month-old American and Turkish infants with contrasting melodies to determine whether cultural background would influence their preferences… Expand

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