Infants, Ancestors, and the Afterlife: Fieldwork's Family Values in Rural West Africa

@article{Gottlieb1998InfantsAA,
  title={Infants, Ancestors, and the Afterlife: Fieldwork's Family Values in Rural West Africa},
  author={A. Gottlieb and P. Graham and Nathaniel Gottlieb‐Graham},
  journal={Agricultural History},
  year={1998},
  volume={23},
  pages={121-126}
}
When Nathaniel, a six-year-old Euro-American boy, was assigned the identity ofDenju, a revered village ancestor in a rural Beng village in Cote d'lvoire, what did it mean - for the child, for his parents, for his village friends, for the conduct of his mother's anthropological research? Likewise, when Nathaniel's father, Philip Graham, learned in the village the news of his own father's passing, what did it mean to Graham - and for the writing of his novel-in-progress - to discover that his… Expand

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