Infantile amnesia reconsidered: A cross-cultural analysis

@article{Wang2003InfantileAR,
  title={Infantile amnesia reconsidered: A cross-cultural analysis},
  author={Qi Wang},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2003},
  volume={11},
  pages={65 - 80}
}
  • Qi Wang
  • Published 1 January 2003
  • Psychology
  • Memory
A number of theories have been offered over the past hundred years to explain the phenomenon of infantile amnesia, the common inability to remember autobiographical experiences from the first years of life. Recent comparative studies that examine autobiographical memories in different populations, particularly populations in North America and East Asia, have yielded intriguing findings that provide a unique opportunity to revisit some of the major theoretical views and to propose new accounts… 
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  • 2004
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