Infant Colic—What works: A Systematic Review of Interventions for Breast-fed Infants

@article{Harb2016InfantCW,
  title={Infant Colic—What works: A Systematic Review of Interventions for Breast-fed Infants},
  author={Tracy Harb and Misa Matsuyama and Michael David and Rebecca Joanne Hill},
  journal={Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition},
  year={2016},
  volume={62},
  pages={668–686}
}
Objectives: To determine the strength of evidence for commonly used interventions for colic in breast-fed and mixed-fed infants younger than 6 months. Methods: Searches of PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, AMED, and Web of Science databases were conducted from July 2014 to July 2015. Included studies were randomised controlled trials involving mothers and their colicky infants younger than 6 months; assessed colic against the Wessel or modified Wessel criteria; and included phytotherapies, prescription… Expand

Paper Mentions

Comparison of common interventions for the treatment of infantile colic: a systematic review of reviews and guidelines
TLDR
The strongest evidence for the treatment of colic was probiotics for breastfed infants, followed by weaker but favourable evidence for manual therapy indicated by crying time, which carried a low risk of serious adverse events. Expand
Probiotics for management of infantile colic: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials
TLDR
Some probiotics, primarily L. reuteri DSM 17938, may be considered for the management of infantile colic and reduced crying times at the end of the intervention, although the effect was mainly seen in exclusively breastfed infants. Expand
A systematic review of prevention and treatment of Infantile colic.
TLDR
Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 is a promising treatment for infantile colic with moderately strong evidence in this review, but studies in more populations are needed. Expand
An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative therapies for infantile colic
TLDR
There is clearly a need for larger and more methodologically sound RCTs to be conducted on the effectiveness of some CAM therapies for IC, and particular focus on probiotics in non-breastfed infants is pertinent. Expand
Lactobacillus reuteri to Treat Infant Colic: A Meta-analysis
TLDR
L reuteri DSM17938 is effective and can be recommended for breastfed infants with colic and whether effects vary by feeding type needs further research, according to an individual participant data meta-analysis. Expand
Probiotics for the management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials
  • J. Deshmukh, M. Deshmukh, S. Patole
  • Medicine
  • The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2019
TLDR
Limited low-quality evidence indicates that probiotic supplementation may reduce the duration of phototherapy in neonates with jaundice and routine use of probiotics to prevent or treat neonatal jaundICE cannot be recommended. Expand
Innovative Dietary Intervention Answers to Baby Colic
TLDR
The intervention formula (partial whey hydrolysate, synbiotic, reduced lactose) significantly reduced the duration of crying and improved QoL of the parents and infants. Expand
Lactobacillus reuteri for Infants with Colic: A Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial
TLDR
Daily administration of L reuteri strain DSM 17938 appears to be safe in newborn infants with colic, including those with neutropenia, which frequently coexists. Expand
Infant colic: mechanisms and management
TLDR
The definitional entanglement with the Rome IV criteria is delineated as the leading, most recent diagnostic criteria for infant colic, and the evidence for gastrointestinal, psychosocial, microbial and neurogenic factors in the pathogenesis of the condition is explored. Expand
Effectiveness of a homeopathic complex medicine in infantile colic: A randomized multicenter study.
TLDR
Enterokind is an effective and safe homeopathic treatment for functional intestinal colic in infants ≤ 6 months and is found to be highly significant between baseline and day 10, estimated from the ANCOVA model. Expand
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