Corpus ID: 28356355

Inexpensive load carrying by rhinoceros beetles

@article{Kram1996InexpensiveLC,
  title={Inexpensive load carrying by rhinoceros beetles},
  author={Kram},
  journal={The Journal of experimental biology},
  year={1996},
  volume={199 Pt 3},
  pages={
          609-12
        }
}
  • Kram
  • Published 1996
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
These experiments determined the magnitude of loads that rhinoceros beetles (Scarabaeidae) can carry and also the metabolic energy required for carrying loads. I hypothesized that, like many other animals, these beetles would have metabolic rates in direct proportion to the total load (body mass plus added mass). Eight beetles (Xylorctes thestalus) walked at 1 cm s-1 on a motorized treadmill enclosed in a respirometer. The beetles could sustain this speed with loads of more than 30 times their… Expand
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