Ineffective crypsis in a crab spider: a prey community perspective

@article{Brechbhl2009IneffectiveCI,
  title={Ineffective crypsis in a crab spider: a prey community perspective},
  author={Rolf Brechb{\"u}hl and J{\'e}r{\^o}me Casas and Sven Bacher},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={277},
  pages={739 - 746}
}
Cryptic coloration is assumed to be beneficial to predators because of an increased encounter rate with unwary prey. This hypothesis is, however, very rarely, if ever, studied in the field. The aim of this study was to quantify the encounter rate and capture success of an ambush predator, in the field, as a function of its level of colour-matching with the background. We used the crab spider Misumena vatia, which varies its body colour and can thereby match the colour of the flower it hunts… 

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