Corpus ID: 18790859

Inducing Altered States of Consciousness with Binaural Beat Technology

@inproceedings{Atwater1997InducingAS,
  title={Inducing Altered States of Consciousness with Binaural Beat Technology},
  author={F. H. Atwater},
  year={1997}
}
  • F. H. Atwater
  • Published 1997
  • Psychology
  • Altering consciousness to provide a wide range of beneficial effects (stress- reducing relaxation, improved sleep, intuitive, creative, meditative, healing, and expanded-learning states, etc.) necessarily involves either changing levels of arousal or cognitive content or both. The extended reticular-thalamic activating system model suggests a neural mechanism responsible for regulating generalized levels of arousal (basic rest-activity cycle, sleep cycles, ultradian rhythms, etc.) as well as… CONTINUE READING
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