Indoor allergens and asthma: report of the Third International Workshop.

@article{PlattsMills1997IndoorAA,
  title={Indoor allergens and asthma: report of the Third International Workshop.},
  author={Thomas A E Platts-Mills and Daniel Vervloet and Wayne R Thomas and Rob C. Aalberse and Martin D. Chapman},
  journal={The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology},
  year={1997},
  volume={100 6 Pt 1},
  pages={
          S2-24
        }
}

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