Corpus ID: 10421455

Indoor air pollution from household use of solid fuels

@inproceedings{Smith2004IndoorAP,
  title={Indoor air pollution from household use of solid fuels},
  author={Kirk R. Smith and Sumi Mehta and Mirjam Maeusezahl-Feuz},
  year={2004}
}
This chapter summarizes the methodology used to assess the burden of disease caused by indoor air pollution from household use of solid fuels. Most research into and control of indoor air pollution worldwide has focused on sources of particular concern in developed countries, such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), volatile organic compounds from furnishings and radon from soil. Although these pollutants have impacts on health, little is known about their global distribution. Thus, we focus… Expand
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