Indonesian ‘king of the sea’ discovered

@article{Erdmann1998IndonesianO,
  title={Indonesian ‘king of the sea’ discovered},
  author={Mark V. Erdmann and Roy L. Caldwell and Mohammad Kasim Moosa},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1998},
  volume={395},
  pages={335-335}
}
On 30 July 1998, an Indonesian population of coelacanth was discovered. It is apparently the same species as the well-known coelacanth from the Comoran archipelago in the Indian Ocean, Latimeria chalumnae Smith. 
A home from home for coelacanths
The discovery of specimens of the coelacanth,Latimeria chalumnae, in Indonesian waters raises questions about the geographical distribution and conservation status of this remarkable fish.
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The sequence of 4,823 bp of mitochondrial DNA from the same specimen, including the entire genes for cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, 16S r RNA, four tRNAs, and the control region is obtained, indicating substantial divergence between the Indonesian and Comorean populations. Expand
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TLDR
It is my privilege to announce the discovery of a Crossopterygian ifish of a type believed to have become extinct by the close of the Mesozoic period, taken by trawl-net some miles west of East London on December 22, 1938. Expand
The Second Cœlacanth