Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and quinolinic acid Immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease hippocampus

@article{Guillemin2005Indoleamine2D,
  title={Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and quinolinic acid Immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease hippocampus},
  author={Gilles J. Guillemin and Bruce J. Brew and C E Noonan and Osamu Takikawa and Karen M. Cullen},
  journal={Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={31}
}
The present immunohistochemical study provides evidence that the kynurenine pathway is up‐regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, leading to increases in the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN). We show that the regulatory enzyme of the pathway leading to QUIN synthesis, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is abundant in AD compared with controls. In AD hippocampus, both IDO‐ and QUIN‐immunoreactivity (‐IR) was detected in cortical microglia, astrocytes and neurones, with microglial and… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Expression of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase and Production of Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites in Triple Transgenic Mice and Human Alzheimer's Disease Brain
TLDR
Results show that the kynurenine pathway is over-activated in AD mice, suggesting that TDO-mediated activation of the kwnurenine pathways could be involved in neurofibrillary tangles formation and associated with senile plaque.
Changes in Cathepsin D and Beclin-1 mRNA and protein expression by the excitotoxin quinolinic acid in human astrocytes and neurons
TLDR
Results suggest that induction of deficits in CatD and Bc1 is a significant mechanism for QUIN toxicity in glial and neuronal cells, and maintenance of autophagy may play a crucial role in neuroprotection in the setting of AD.
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