Individual differences in locus of control during the second half of the life span for identical and fraternal twins reared apart and reared together.

Abstract

The relative influences of genetic and environmental factors for components of locus of control (LOC) were examined in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging. The sample consisted of 84 pairs of monozygotic twins separated at an early age and reared apart, 173 pairs of dizygotic twins reared apart, 129 monozygotic pairs reared together, and 168 dizygotic pairs reared together. At the time of data collection, 72% were over 50 years of age. Three LOC components were measured in a mailed questionnaire: sense of personal control or lack of control over the direction of one's own life (Life Direction), beliefs about how responsible people are for misfortunes in their lives (Responsibility), and beliefs concerning the role of luck in determining people's outcomes (Luck). Model-fitting results indicated that genetic influences were of importance for Life Direction and Responsibility, accounting for somewhat over 30% of the variance in each component, while environmental influences explained twin similarity for Luck.

Cite this paper

@article{Pedersen1989IndividualDI, title={Individual differences in locus of control during the second half of the life span for identical and fraternal twins reared apart and reared together.}, author={Nancy L Pedersen and Margaret Gatz and Robert Plomin and John R . Nesselroade and Gerald E . McClearn}, journal={Journal of gerontology}, year={1989}, volume={44 4}, pages={P100-5} }