Individual and collective problem-solving in a foraging context in the leaf-cutting ant Atta colombica

@article{Dussutour2008IndividualAC,
  title={Individual and collective problem-solving in a foraging context in the leaf-cutting ant Atta colombica},
  author={Audrey Dussutour and Jean-Louis Deneubourg and Samuel N. Beshers and Vincent Fourcassi{\'e}},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2008},
  volume={12},
  pages={21-30}
}
In this paper we investigate the flexibility of foraging behavior in the leaf-cutting ant Atta colombica, both at the individual and collective levels, following a change in the physical properties of their environment. We studied in laboratory conditions the changes occurring in foraging behavior when a height constraint was placed 1 cm above part of the trail linking the nest to the foraging area. We found that the size and shape of the fragments of foraging material brought back to the nest… Expand

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