Individual and collective decision-making during nest site selection by the ant Leptothorax albipennis

@article{Mallon2001IndividualAC,
  title={Individual and collective decision-making during nest site selection by the ant Leptothorax albipennis},
  author={E. Mallon and S. Pratt and N. Franks},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={50},
  pages={352-359}
}
Abstract. Social insect colonies possess remarkable abilities to select the best among several courses of action. In populous societies with highly efficient recruitment behaviour, decision-making is distributed across many individuals, each acting on limited local information with appropriate decision rules. To investigate the degree to which small societies with less efficient recruitment can also employ distributed decision-making, we studied nest site selection in Leptothorax albipennis… Expand

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