Individual Variation in Social Aggression and the Probability of Inheritance: Theory and a Field Test

@article{Cant2006IndividualVI,
  title={Individual Variation in Social Aggression and the Probability of Inheritance: Theory and a Field Test},
  author={M. Cant and Justine B Llop and J. Field},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2006},
  volume={167},
  pages={837 - 852}
}
Recent theory suggests that much of the wide variation in individual behavior that exists within cooperative animal societies can be explained by variation in the future direct component of fitness, or the probability of inheritance. Here we develop two models to explore the effect of variation in future fitness on social aggression. The models predict that rates of aggression will be highest toward the front of the queue to inherit and will be higher in larger, more productive groups. A third… Expand
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