Individual Odor Recognition in Procellariiform Chicks

@article{ODwyer2009IndividualOR,
  title={Individual Odor Recognition in Procellariiform Chicks},
  author={Terence W. O'Dwyer and Gabrielle A Nevitt},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={1170}
}
  • T. O'Dwyer, G. Nevitt
  • Published 1 July 2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Since the groundbreaking work of Wenzel, Bang, and Grubb in the 1960s, enormous progress has been made toward elucidating the sense of smell in procellariiform seabirds. Although it is now well established that adult procellariiforms use olfaction in many behaviors, such as for foraging, nest relocation, and mate recognition, the olfactory abilities of petrel chicks are less well understood. Recent studies have shown that petrel chicks can recognize prey‐related odors and odors associated with… 
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