India–Eurasia collision chronology has implications for crustal shortening and driving mechanism of plates

@article{Patriat1984IndiaEurasiaCC,
  title={India–Eurasia collision chronology has implications for crustal shortening and driving mechanism of plates},
  author={Philippe Patriat and Jos{\'e} Achache},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1984},
  volume={311},
  pages={615-621}
}
The motion of the Indian plate is determined in an absolute frame of reference and compared with the position of the southern margin of Eurasia deduced from palaeomagnetic data in Tibet. The 2,600±900 km of continental crust shortening observed is shown to have occurred in three different episodes: subduction of continental crust, intracontinental thrusting and internal deformation, and lateral extrusion. The detailed chronology of the collision and plate reorganizations in the Indian and… 
Uplift of Tibetan Plateau
A history of the elevation and crustal thickness of the Tibetan Plateau since the continental collision at 45 Ma has been computed using a kinematic model based on plate tectonic reconstructions and
Role of lithospheric strength heterogeneities in the tectonics of Tibet and neighbouring regions
Unlike rigid oceanic plates, continents show diffuse deformation, for example the Tibetan plateau that has accommodated much of the convergence of India with Asia. We interpret the Tertiary
Structure and tectonic evolution of the western continental margin of India: Evidence from subsidence studies for a 25–20 Ma plate reorganization in the Indian Ocean
The western continental margin of India developed by Mesozoic rifting and has subsided and undergone further tectonic modification during India’s northward movement and collision with Asia.
Palaeomagnetic estimates of crustal shortening in the Himalayan thrusts and Zangbo suture
This article reports new palaeomagnetic results from precisely-dated late Palaeocene limestones from the former northern margin of the Indian subcontinent, now in Tibet, between the major Himalayan
Evolution of the Indian Ocean and the drift of India: A vicariant event
  • C. Hocutt
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Hydrobiologia
  • 2004
The contemporary hypothesis of plate tectonics allows for the dismembering of a Mesozoic megacontinental land mass, Pangaea, into two supercontinents, Laurasia and Gondwana. Encompassing the current
Shortening of analogue models of the continental lithosphere: New hypothesis for the formation of the Tibetan plateau
Initial stages of compression produce periodic buckling of models analogous to a four-layer continental lithosphere. With further shortening, amplification of the buckles occurs by thrust faulting at
The Gangdese retroarc thrust belt revealed
The Cretaceous–early Tertiary Gangdese arc in southern Tibet is generally attributed to the northward subduction of Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere prior to Indo-Asian collision. However, the history
Structure and tectonics of western continental margin of India: Implication for geologic hazards
The geomorphological and geological characteristics of Western Continental Margin of India (WCMI) are closely related to the tectonic history of the Indian subcontinent, its break up during
Intraplate stresses: A new tectonic mechanism for fluctuations of relative sea level
Stress variations in the lithosphere of a few hundred bars can explain the major part of the seismostratigraphic record at passive margins and intracratonic basins. However, to induce apparent
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
Structure and evolution of the Himalaya–Tibet orogenic belt
The 1981 French–Chinese expedition to Tibet focused on the Lhasa block, extending earlier coverage 400 km north of the Tsangpo suture. The Lhasa block stood between 10 and 15° N latitude over most of
Palaeomagnetic estimates of crustal shortening in the Himalayan thrusts and Zangbo suture
This article reports new palaeomagnetic results from precisely-dated late Palaeocene limestones from the former northern margin of the Indian subcontinent, now in Tibet, between the major Himalayan
India's and Australia's pole path since the late Mesozoic and the India–Asia collision
The Indian apparent polar wandering path (APW) for the late Mesozoic–Cenozoic period has been too poorly defined to use as a constraint to establish the timing of collision of India and Asia. Here we
Drift of the major continental blocks since the Devonian
  • E. Irving
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    Nature
  • 1977
Palaeomagnetic evidence indicates that the continents have been in a more-or-less continuous relative motion. At the end of the Palaeozoic there was a redistribution of the major continental blocks
The Tibetan side of the India–Eurasia collision
Results are reported from the 1980 joint French–Chinese field expedition in Tibet. The area covered was from the High Himalaya in the south, to the region of Nagqu ∼250 km north of Yangbajain.
Tectonic models of the Tibetan plateau
Tectonic models proposed for the origin of the Tibetan plateau and surrounding regions all have some inadequacies, but models involving underthrusting continental lithosphere of India beneath the
Propagating rifts and continental breakup
A simple quantitative model is proposed whereby continental breakup starts with a phase of continental rifting and continues with the propagation of rifts toward locked zones. These zones are
...
...