Corpus ID: 12265843

Index for A Place to Browse-The Food Insects Newsletter Home THE FOOD INSECTS

@inproceedings{Blum2012IndexFA,
  title={Index for A Place to Browse-The Food Insects Newsletter Home THE FOOD INSECTS},
  author={Murray Sheldon Blum},
  year={2012}
}
MARCH 1994 VOLUME VII, NO. 1 Ed.: This is the second in a series of invited articles on potential hazards that could be posed by indiscriminate consumption of insects. It is hoped that space in the July Newsletter will permit a followup interview with Dr. Blum and also with Dr. Berenbaum, author of the first paper. The third paper in the series, on insects as allergens, is tentatively scheduled for the November 1994 Newsletter. 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES
CHEMICAL DEFENCE IN LONGHORN BEETLES OF THE GENERA STENOCENTRUS AND SYLLITUS (COLEOPTERA: CERAMBYCIDAE)
i Toluene and o-cresol have been identified as the main volatile components of the defensive secretions in Stenocentrus ostricilla (Newman) and Syllitus grammicus (Newman). These materials areExpand
The Defensive Chemistry of Land and Water Beetles
Wherever life forms have arisen, they have had to defend themselves, even on the lowest levels, against their own kind. Darwin called this the struggle for life. The following discussion shows thatExpand
Systemic retention of ingested cantharidin by frogs
TLDR
Systemic cantharidin does not protect frogs against ectoparasitic feeding by leeches or predation by snakes, and ingestion of cantharsin-containing frogs can pose a health threat to humans. Expand
HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN THE DEFENSIVE SECRETIONS OF LARVAL PAROPSINI (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE)
Hydrogen cyanide, benzaldehyde and glucose have been identified as components of the larval defensive secretion in three species of leaf beetles, belonging to the genera Paropsis and Chrysophtharta.Expand
Cardiac glycosides in the defensive secretion of chrysomelid beetles: evidence for their production by the insects.
TLDR
Evidence indicates that the beetles do not sequester these steroid glycoside derivatives linked to a pentose from their host plants. Expand
Collection and ConsuDlption of Pandora Moth, Coloradia pandora lindseyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), Larvae by OlVens Valley and Mono Lake Paiutes
TLDR
Human entomophagy is not limited to “primitive” peoples or practiced only in cases of critical food shortage, and modern Indian people in the United States who choose to collect and eat larvae of the pandora moth, Coloradia pandora lindseyi Barnes & Benjamin. Expand
Cantharidin: Potent Feeding Deterrent to Insects
Cantharidin, the well-known terpenoid compound from the blood of blister beetles (and active principle of Spanish fly), is a feeding deterrent to insects, effective at a concentration of 10-5 molar.
Lucibufagins: Defensive steroids from the fireflies Photinus ignitus and P. marginellus (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).
TLDR
Feeding tests with thrushes led to the isolation of three novel steroid pyrones from fireflies responsible, in part at least, for the unpalatability of these insects to the birds. Expand
Defensive secretions of tiger beetles: Cyanogenetic basis
Abstract 1. 1. The defensive secretion of the tiger bettle Megacephala virginica contains benzaldehyde, HCN, and mandelonitrile. 2. 2. The significance of convergent biochemical evolution in theExpand
Reflex bleeding in the lampyrid Photinus pyralis: Defensive function
TLDR
Children of the firefly Photinus pyralis exhibit reflex bleeding when tactually stimulated, and the viscid blood is an effective deterrent against invertebrate predators such as ants. Expand
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