Independent evolution of bitter-taste sensitivity in humans and chimpanzees

@article{Wooding2006IndependentEO,
  title={Independent evolution of bitter-taste sensitivity in humans and chimpanzees},
  author={Stephen Wooding and Bernd Bufe and Christina Grassi and Michael T. Howard and Anne C. Stone and Maribel Vazquez and Diane Marie Dunn and Wolfgang Meyerhof and Robert B. Weiss and Michael J. Bamshad},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={440},
  pages={930-934}
}
It was reported over 65 years ago that chimpanzees, like humans, vary in taste sensitivity to the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC. [...] Key Result Association testing of PTC sensitivity in a cohort of captive chimpanzees confirmed that chimpanzee TAS2R38 genotype accurately predicts taster status in vivo. Therefore, although Fisher et al.'s observations were accurate, their explanation was wrong. Humans and chimpanzees share variable taste sensitivity to bitter compounds mediated by PTC receptor…Expand
Rapid Expansion of Phenylthiocarbamide Non-Tasters among Japanese Macaques
TLDR
It is found that a PTC “non-taster” TAS2R38 allele in Japanese macaques lost its receptor function for perceiving PTC, suggesting that positive selection resulted in a rapid increase in PTC non-tasters in the Kii population during the last 13,000 years. Expand
Diversification of bitter taste receptor gene family in western chimpanzees.
TLDR
Comparing the intraspecies variations in chimpanzees to those already known for all 25 human functional T2R genes revealed that the evolution of cT1R genes was almost identical to that of putative neutral regions with slight but significantly positive Tajima's D values, suggesting that selective constraint on these genes was relaxed with weak balancing selection. Expand
Evolution of functionally diverse alleles associated with PTC bitter taste sensitivity in Africa.
TLDR
Striking patterns of variation are reported at TAS2R38, including a significant excess of novel rare nonsynonymous polymorphisms that recently arose only in Africa, high frequencies of haplotypes in Africa associated with intermediate bitter taste sensitivity, a remarkably similar frequency of common haplotypes across genetically and culturally distinct Africans, and an ancient coalescence time of common variation in global populations. Expand
Title Rapid Expansion of Phenylthiocarbamide NonTasters amongJapanese Macaques
Bitter taste receptors (TAS2R proteins) allow mammals to detect and avoid ingestion of toxins in food. Thus, TAS2Rs play an important role in food choice and are subject to complex natural selectionExpand
Identification of non-taster Japanese macaques for a specific bitter taste
TLDR
Genetic and behavioral evidence is reported for the existence of “non-taster” Japanese macaques, which originated from a restricted region of Japan and might give a clue for elucidating the ecological, evolutionary, and neurobiological aspects of bitter taste perception of primates, as related to the plants that they sometimes use as foods in their habitats. Expand
Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Humans and Chimpanzees
TLDR
By comparing the bitter taste receptor genes of humans with their closest relative, the chimpanzee, the authors learn about some of the evolutionary forces that shaped the development of modern human beings and indicate relaxed evolutionary constraints in the primate lineage. Expand
Global diversity in the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor: revisiting a classic evolutionary PROPosal
TLDR
Evidence is provided for a relaxation of recent selective forces acting on this gene and a revised hypothesis for the origins of the present-day worldwide distribution of TAS2R38 haplotypes is revised. Expand
Evolution of the bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 in colobines
TLDR
It is found that PTC sensitivity is lower in TAS2R38s of African colobines than in Tasmanian macaques of omnivorous macaques, indicating that they evolved independently after the separation of these groups. Expand
Signatures of Natural Selection in a Primate Bitter Taste Receptor
  • S. Wooding
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • 2011
TLDR
Significant patterns in signatures of selection in the primate TAS2R38 gene point to a history of rapid yet constrained change in bitter taste responses in the course of primate evolution. Expand
Evolution of a Bitter Taste Receptor Gene Cluster in a New World Sparrow
TLDR
The results suggest that interspecies and intraspecies genetic variability does exist in avian TAS2Rs and that these differences could contribute to variation in bitter taste perception in birds. Expand
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