Independent cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by Cardinium and Wolbachia maintains endosymbiont coinfections in haplodiploid thrips populations

@article{Nguyen2017IndependentCI,
  title={Independent cytoplasmic incompatibility induced by Cardinium and Wolbachia maintains endosymbiont coinfections in haplodiploid thrips populations},
  author={Duong Thi Thuy Nguyen and Jennifer L. Morrow and Robert N. Spooner-hart and Markus Riegler},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={71}
}
Cardinium and Wolbachia are common maternally inherited reproductive parasites that can coinfect arthropods, yet interactions between both bacterial endosymbionts are rarely studied. For the first time, we report their independent expression of complete cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) in a coinfected host, and CI in a species of the haplodiploid insect order Thysanoptera. In Pezothrips kellyanus, Cardinium‐induced CI resulted in a combination of male development (MD) and embryonic female… Expand
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