Independent and additive association of prenatal famine exposure and intermediary life conditions with adult mortality between age 18-63 years.

@article{Ekamper2014IndependentAA,
  title={Independent and additive association of prenatal famine exposure and intermediary life conditions with adult mortality between age 18-63 years.},
  author={Peter Ekamper and Frans W. A. van Poppel and Aryeh D. Stein and L. H. Lumey},
  journal={Social science \& medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={119},
  pages={
          232-9
        }
}

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