Increasing the salience of fluency cues does not reduce the recognition memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease!

@article{Simon2018IncreasingTS,
  title={Increasing the salience of fluency cues does not reduce the recognition memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease!},
  author={Jessica Mary Simon and Christine Bastin and Eric Salmon and S. J. W. Willems},
  journal={Journal of neuropsychology},
  year={2018},
  volume={12 2},
  pages={
          216-230
        }
}
In Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is now well established that recollection is impaired from the beginning of the disease, whereas findings are less clear concerning familiarity. One of the most important mechanisms underlying familiarity is the sense of familiarity driven by processing fluency. In this study, we attempted to attenuate recognition memory deficits in AD by maximizing the salience of fluency cues in two conditions of a recognition memory task. In one condition, targets and foils… CONTINUE READING
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