Increasing rates of malarial fever with deteriorating immune status in HIV-1-infected Ugandan adults

@article{French2001IncreasingRO,
  title={Increasing rates of malarial fever with deteriorating immune status in HIV-1-infected Ugandan adults},
  author={Neil French and Jessica S Nakiyingi and Eric Lugada and Christine Watera and James A Whitworth and Charles F. Gilks},
  journal={AIDS},
  year={2001},
  volume={15},
  pages={899-906}
}
BackgroundFalciparum malaria and HIV-1 infection are two of the most important health problems facing sub-Saharan Africa. No convincing evidence of an association between symptomatic malaria and HIV-1 infection has been found. ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of HIV-associated immunosuppression on malarial fever rates. DesignAn observational cohort study in HIV-specific, primary healthcare clinics in Entebbe, Uganda, on 1371 HIV-1-infected adults participating in a randomized trial of 23… 
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Effects of HIV-1 infection on malaria parasitemia in milo sub-location, western Kenya
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The findings showed a higher prevalence of malaria in children aged 2–10 years (73.4%), against the one reported in children in lake Victoria endemic region by the Kenya malaria indicator survey in the year 2010 (38.1%) and HIV-1 status was not found to have effect on malaria infection.
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    Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • 2005
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HIV-infected nonimmune adults are at increased risk of severe malaria, and this risk is associated with a low CD4+ T cell count.
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TLDR
Parasitaemia is higher in HIV-infected than uninfected children and the burden is highest at infancy, while acquisition of antimalarial immunity is similar in both groups.
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TLDR
HIV infection was associated with severe/complicated malaria, although the magnitude of the effect may be relatively small, and coma, age <1 year and low white blood cell count were the clearest predictors of poor outcome.
Effect of HIV-1 infection on antimalarial treatment outcomes in Uganda: a population-based study.
TLDR
The HIV-1 seroprevalence rate was surprisingly high in adults presenting with malaria, and this finding supports the implementation of routine HIV counseling and testing for adults with uncomplicated falciparum malaria.
Effect of HIV-1 infection on malaria treatment outcome in Ugandan patients.
TLDR
Adherence to cotrimoxazole prophylaxis should be reinforced in HIV positive patients and it should be reassessed if these patients present with acute episodes of malaria.
Malaria treatment efficacy among people living with HIV: the role of host and parasite factors.
TLDR
Decreased CD4 cell count was not associated with impaired response to antimalarial therapy or diminished ability to clear SP-resistant parasites, suggesting that acquired immunity to malaria is retained in the face of HIV-associated immunosuppression.
Effect of HIV infection on the acute antibody response to malaria antigens in children: an observational study
TLDR
In children with severe malaria, HIV infection is associated with a lower magnitude and narrower breadth of IgG responses to merozoite antigens and stunting of age-related acquisition of the IgG antibody response to schizont extract.
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