Increasing rates of ice mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets revealed by GRACE

@article{Velicogna2009IncreasingRO,
  title={Increasing rates of ice mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets revealed by GRACE},
  author={Isabella Velicogna},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2009},
  volume={36}
}
  • I. Velicogna
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Environmental Science
  • Geophysical Research Letters
We use monthly measurements of time‐variable gravity from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite gravity mission to determine the ice mass‐loss for the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets during the period between April 2002 and February 2009. We find that during this time period the mass loss of the ice sheets is not a constant, but accelerating with time, i.e., that the GRACE observations are better represented by a quadratic trend than by a linear one, implying that the… 

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