Corpus ID: 21968878

Increasing participation of physicians and patients from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials.

@article{Christian2003IncreasingPO,
  title={Increasing participation of physicians and patients from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials.},
  author={Michaele Christian and Edward Lloyd Trimble},
  journal={Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers \& prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology},
  year={2003},
  volume={12 3},
  pages={
          277s-283s
        }
}
  • M. Christian, E. Trimble
  • Published 1 March 2003
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Significant disparities exist in cancer incidence among racial and ethnic groups in the United States [(1)][1] . Cancer incidence and mortality rates by gender and race/ethnicity for the most common cancers are shown in Figs. 1[⇓][2] 2[⇓][3] 3[⇓][4] 4[⇓][5] . Blacks have a higher mortality 
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